“Southern Harvester” and “Balaena” at Husvik

“Southern Harvester” and “Balaena” at Husvik

Kokeriene “Southern Harvester” and “Balaena” summer circulation by Husvik. Between these ships is United Whalers’ freezing / supply vessels “Bransfield”. Tinted by Geir Rosset.

 

Photo: Wikimedia Commons
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Hvalkokerier by Bellsund

Hvalkokerier by Bellsund

View of Bellsund, at Spitsbergen, i 1905. The first three ships from the left: Turistskipet DS “Kong Harald”, Flk “Bucentaur” and Flk “Vale”. The first sailing ship from left are probably carcass digester “Aviemore”. The second sailing vessel is unknown, but may be A / S fisherman's “Figaro”.

Framnæs Mechanical Workshop

Framnæs Mechanical Workshop

A great overview of Framnæs Mechanical Workshop. Using dock lists to Framnæs I have come from that photo was taken between 17. and 26. July 1933 – Table Mountain (in front of), Ole Wegger (in the middle), Rosshavets hvalbåter “Star II”, “Star IX”, “Star X” and “Star XV” in the small removable dock, cosmos II in the large floating dock, C.A. Larsen (second top left) and Torodd fjord in circulation (top left). The following year Torodd sold to Norwegian whale products in Oslo and renamed “Sydis”.
Photographer: unknown.
Before whale claw

Before whale claw

I 1925 came slipway to Petter Sørlle. Despite the fact that this made working up the whale easier in bad weather, it was still a dangerous job to get the whales up on deck. Whale Kloa did not come until the 1931/32, before this had two men lowered into the steeps and stick padded wire to the whale's tail so that the whales could be drawn up.
Photographer: unknown.
Hvb "Duncan Grey"

Hvb "Duncan Grey"

Whaling boat “Duncan Grey”, on the way into Skaarø with whale in tow, will be joined by a passenger ship. It was not unusual at that time that passenger- and cruise ships entered the whaling stations or whaling factory to allow passengers to watch the capture of the world's largest animal.
“Duncan Grey” caught, together with “Nancy Grey”, for “The Anglo-Norwegian Whalefishing Co. Ltd.” the land station on Skaarø. Was later sold to Pesca, sent to Grytviken and renamed “small Karl”.
Photographer: unknown.
Flk "Southern Empress"

Flk "Southern Empress"

Flk “Southern Empress” with tugs outermost Sandefjordsfjord summer 1936. The story behind the picture is that it was a strike among the Norwegian crews because. the conflict between Unilever (Southern Whaling & Sealing parent company) og Southern Whaling & Sealing was in danger of not getting prepared her (and her sister ship “Southern Princess”) out in time for the start of the season. It was therefore brought three tugs over to Sandefjord from England to lug her over to England to start the equipment where.

Photographer: unknown.

Hvb "Port Saunders"

Hvb "Port Saunders"

The Norwegian built whaleboat “Port Saunders”. The boat was built by Akers Mek. i 1904 for Hawkes Bay Whaling Co. (Newfoundland). In the early 1920s, the boat was sold to California Sea Products Co., a company founded by Norwegian emigrant Frederick Kristian Dietrichson (F.K. Dedrick).
It came beyond the 1920s laws prohibiting ships built outside the United States to take part in the fisheries in the United States (after a major case involving the sale of the Norwegian-built catchers “Hawk” and “Port Saunders” from Newfoundland to California Sea Products Co.. i San Francisco).

Hvb "Port Saunders"

HVB “Port Saunders”


Photographer: unknown.