Antarctic in dry dock

Antarctic in dry dock

This picture, taken by Roald Bjorndal in dry dock in Cape Town, shows the damage to the rudder and propeller after Antarctic (II) were frozen inside the ice and had to try to break out. The captain's lack of experience in ice and under a little too fierce backing to take headway so narrow stern to the Antarctic into the ice and destroyed helm. The propeller smallt into the bent tube and loses one blade and bent the other. The rudder loosened eventually completely and sank to the bottom of the Antarctic. The fact that Antarctic had only one propeller made Antractic sat helplessly stuck.
Meanwhile lay Pelagos so that they could come to the rescue, but to help Antarctic meant to delay the ship and the crew of real danger. They could suffer the same fate as the Antarctic and the captain let it therefore be up to the crew to decide whether they should go in to try to get her away. No stemmte contrary, and prospered to tow Antarctic safety. The tow was on 3000 nautical miles, until Cape Town, for repairs. This rescue operation has been standing as a shining example of excellent seamanship.
Year:1946
Photo: Roald Bjorndal

C.A. Larsen

C.A. Larsen

Flk C.A. Larsen (1926) with three catchers outside Steward Island after running aground on the way north from the Ross Sea in nice weather 21/2-1928.
It succeeded to pull the ship off the ground. The ship could go its own steam and was set up on a sandbar. The ship and about 90% the cargo was salvaged. Next season, the ship was in the Ross Sea.
After World War II sold to Whaling Company Antarctic AS in Tønsberg and renamed Antarctic.
Photo: Ove Christiansen
Year: 1928
Click the image for a larger version.
Mer on Flk C.A. Larsen her.

C.A. Larsen

C.A. Larsen

Flk C.A. Larsen (1926) with three catchers outside Steward Island after running aground on the way north from the Ross Sea in nice weather 21/2-1928.
It succeeded to pull the ship off the ground. The ship could go its own steam and was set up on a sandbar. The ship and about 90% the cargo was salvaged. Next season, the ship was in the Ross Sea.
After World War II sold to Whaling Company Antarctic AS in Tønsberg and renamed Antarctic.
Photo: Ove Christiansen
Year: 1928
Click the image for a larger version.
Mer on Flk C.A. Larsen her.