Antarctic in dry dock

Antarctic in dry dock

This picture, taken by Roald Bjorndal in dry dock in Cape Town, shows the damage to the rudder and propeller after Antarctic (II) were frozen inside the ice and had to try to break out. The captain's lack of experience in ice and under a little too fierce backing to take headway so narrow stern to the Antarctic into the ice and destroyed helm. The propeller smallt into the bent tube and loses one blade and bent the other. The rudder loosened eventually completely and sank to the bottom of the Antarctic. The fact that Antarctic had only one propeller made Antractic sat helplessly stuck.
Meanwhile lay Pelagos so that they could come to the rescue, but to help Antarctic meant to delay the ship and the crew of real danger. They could suffer the same fate as the Antarctic and the captain let it therefore be up to the crew to decide whether they should go in to try to get her away. No stemmte contrary, and prospered to tow Antarctic safety. The tow was on 3000 nautical miles, until Cape Town, for repairs. This rescue operation has been standing as a shining example of excellent seamanship.
Year:1946
Photo: Roald Bjorndal

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Thanks to Roald Bjorndal (rightmost in the picture) who worked as oiler aboard Flk Antarctic (II). Roald was doing when the Antarctic support on ice in an attempt to break out of the Ross Sea in 1946. They were towed until Cape Town of Pelagos and put in dry dock. Roald sent me picture of stern on Antarctic from the dry dock and written down some of his experiences from whaling.
The picture is otherwise taken on the deck of Antarctic while she was in the port of Cape Town. Flk Antarctic called before the war C.A. Larsen and was chartered to Germany. This allowed the owners A / S Blaa whale was refused a license when whaling was taken up again after the war. The vessel was instead sold Antarctic A / S (Anton von der Lippe, part of Jahre group) Tonsberg and put in catch as part of the common catch under the condition that it was the first expedition that would have to pull out if it came requirement to reduce the total catch.