Salvesen

Salvesen

From Al Greig I received the following photo with a section of “The Great Tapestry of Scotland”.

The text below is as follows:

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Whaling

Whale oil was used in lighting and demand drove a major expansion in whaling. Whaling ships sailed the Arctic out of ports such as Dundee and Peterhead until overfishing seriously depleted stocks. In the early 1900s, Christian Salvesen built whaling stations in Shetland and on the island of South Georgia in the Antarctic. He used the entire carcass of the whale and became the largest whaling company in the world. By the end of the 20th century, stocks had dwindled alarmingly. A complete ban on fishing had to be imposed to allow whale populations to recover.

The Great Tapestry of Scotland

Photo: Al Greig
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“Southern Venturer” Find and compare hotels in Leith Harbor, South Georgia

“Southern Venturer” Find and compare hotels in Leith Harbor, South Georgia

Kokeriet “Southern Venturer” Find and compare hotels in Leith Harbor, South Georgia. In the background is what looks like the transport ship “Southern Opal”.

Original color image. Just cleaned up and color-stained p.g.a. fading.

Photo: Tommy Moore
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Leith Harbour

Leith Harbour

Picture taken in Leith Harbor on South Georgia between 1926 and 1932.
 
From Carlos Pereira in Montevideo we can add the following information about the image:
 

The ships are moored at the so-called “municipal pier” and in the distance is the “guano pier”. The day that the picture was taken was probably a holiday, (Boxing day?) as the first ship is full of people, probably coming from a nearby whaling station, and there are dressed or adorned ships with flags.
From left to right:
The first is a whale catcher and looks to me, because of the Norwegian flag and the funnel, like a Busen boat, probably Busen 5 or 6 built 1925 (see photo Norwegian Maritime Museum Digital Museum here.)
The second a cargo vessel unidentified, Norwegian flag, dark funnel.
Third, fourth, fifth and sixth are Salvesen whale catchers , all have gangways (photo post 1926 maybe 1927 1928?) by the casing and the form of the stem, I think they are: the three identical catchers build in 1925 by Smith’s Dock, Soika, SWONA SOTRA and SPOSA. The Salvesen ships have the name painted in big letters in front of the navigation bridge. Another indication is that they have the upper half of the crow’s nest painted dark.
Down 7 is unknown. Maybe a smaller whale catcher.
And number 8, a surprise, is the Royal Research Ship “William Scoresby” fully dressed, recognizable by the mast with top mast, horizontal yard and gaff spar, the white line in the hull, clear (yellow?) funnel and shape of the bow.

 
See more from Theodor Andersson's photo collection on Hvalfangstarkiver.no
Posted with permission from The Whaling Museum in Sandefjord.
Photographer: Theodor Andersson
Year: 1926-32
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