Hvb "Southern Lotus"

Hvb "Southern Lotus"

Salvesens hvalbåt “Southern Lotus”. Built as HSE “Phlox”, launched as HMS “Lotus”. Taken over by the Free French Navy in May 1942 and renamed “Commander d'Estienne d'Orves”. Returned Great Britain in May 1947 and again given name “Lotus”. Bought by South Georgia Co.. i 1948. Bøyebåt 1948-1952, Whaler from 1953 to 1963.

Hvb "Southern Lotus"

HVB “Southern Lotus”


Photo: Allison Karlsen
Year: The end of the '50s

Japanese Whaler

Japanese Whaler

Japanese Whaler Toshi Maru No. 12 which operated for Taiyo Ggyogyo Kabushikikaisha on the way out of Grytviken in 1963/64 (who was last season with the capture of the station). The product produced was whale meat for the Japanese market.
Thank you to Hayato Kujira for information on TGK.
Photographer: Dave Wheeler
Year: 1963/64
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Southern Laurel

Southern Laurel

Bending boat Southern Laurel coming into the digester Southern Venturer with whale. Southern Laurel Built into full-fledged catcher in 1952.
Southern Laurel was constructed in 1940 as Flower Class Korvette HSE Carnation (sold to the Dutch Navy and renamed Friso).
Photographer: Allan Stewart Greig
CopyrightAl Greig
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Hunting of leopard in mother fjord

Hunting of leopard in mother fjord

At the end of the winter season 48-49 we were four comrades as a Sunday, planned to go out to hunt for leopard. For the trip we got to borrow a bøyebåt (was used to retrieve shot whales from the bend and into the blubber on land. The boat had a strong diesel engine and wheelhouse).
We took ourselves out on the fjord (Cumberland) outside Grytvika without seeing traces of seals. We searched into the mother fjord, a small narrow fjord work involving horse Sletta where we discovered large colony of seals. Here trips we have five animals that were flanged on the spot and taken on board. Each animal weighed about 100 kg. After 3-4 hours we headed toward the station in the heavy load.
The trip back was quite dramatic when we were greeted by a grunnbrott who probably had arisen because of the tide. The violent wave against us made sure we had ground, then take us out again when the sea lay. This we had to do twice when the waves came. Thanks to experienced comrades we managed to maneuver us out. These were Einar from Ramnes, Førstereis as dinghy boy bending boat and Rolf Hansen Langesund (No.. 1 from left in the picture), who had plenty of experience at sea.
 

– Leif Brandt