whaling Portrait

whaling Portrait

A well-bearded whaler enjoying some free time in his cabin on board the Thor Dahls Flk Thorshammer. Harald Werner, who worked as a radio and radar technician aboard (he was also responsible for catchers) spent much of his free time to take pictures and many board ordered portraits that were mailed after this season.
Photo: Harald Werner

Thorshammer

Thorshammer

Thorshammer during a stop on the way south (hull looks a good and freshly painted out that it is hardly on the way home from the ice).
Photo: Harald Werner

new Contributor!

new Contributor!

This time we want to thank Torjus Werner for having contributed a large collection of photos taken by his father, Harald Werner, which was radar technician on flk Thorshammer for years.
 
 

Torjus Werner Norway
As radar technician for expedition, my father was stationed at the factory ship, and had the workshop where. He serviced, however, all catchers who belonged to the factory ship and had repairs and maintenance on radio, radar, sonar and sonar usually about. 11 boats in the expedition. He had enough often camera in addition to tools suitcase so there are therefore also part images from the individual catchers in the expedition. As you can see the scope of the collection so my father was a bit more than a typical amateur photographer at the time this comes. Free time his was probably why a lot of photography hobby. He bought the film in the meter and shared on spools as needed. In addition to the darkroom in the basement at home, He had rigged a darkroom in the cabin or in the radio workshop at Thorshammer. There elicited he both movies and photos during the season. He had also made himself a magnifying device that he had there, in addition to "fine set" that stood in the darkroom at home. You will also see some pictures where people playing cards, or bowls with itself. It was not a case of digital image processing at the time, so to take those pictures he had experimented forward to a "half-closing mechanism" which he assembled in front of the lens. Then he could only take one half of the picture, turn over the shutter and take the other half of the picture on the same negative. See picture on this page for example of "mechanical imaging» about 1960. In this picture are also his own constructed magnifying apparatus in the background with the bulb holder at the top that are soldered together of tin from cans, stand copper water pipe with adjustable height, lens and bellows of a disassembled belgkamera etc.. He partly financed the hobby of taking orders for photos before returning home. The first few weeks at home, he spent so much time in the darkroom, and I got a job with gloss and drying. (The process that allows the wet images from chemical baths were dry, smooth and got glossy finish. The pictures were rolled onto a polished metal plate, and inserted in an electric dryer.) I do not remember how many ears I got per image, but it was very ok with a little pocket money. I also got the job of going "on the record" with the envelopes to be sent out on cash on delivery. It was enough, then as now, easy to order from a "directory" without thinking that they should be paid, for there was always some envelopes that were not taken and were returned.